Finding Free Images on the Web

Clients often need images for their website and printed materials. Here is a short list of resources where you can download free images as well as premium images.

Clients often need images for their website and printed materials. Here is a short list of resources where you can download free images as well as premium images.

DreamsTime

http://www.dreamstime.com/
Stock photos at a reasonable price. Web sites only need photos no wider than 400px.

Google Search


Using Google search to find Creative Commons images.


You can use Google to find photos that have a creative commons license. When you do this, always give the owner credit or attribution by including the website URL in the credits of your document.

Click on the image for a larger view

Google is constantly being redesigned so your click pattern may be different. This image shows the keywords to look for.

To keep track of the attribution store your creative commons images in a special folder. Include a text file or Word document that lists or shows a small thumbnail of the image and the URL of the site you got it from.

Often times photos are HUGE. Use an image editor such as http://pixlr.com to change the size of the image. Include the new size in the file name for quick reference and to keep from overwriting the original. For example: shetlandPony.jpg would become shetlandPony300x250.jpg.

Flickr

https://www.flickr.com

Using Flickr to find Creative Commons images.


Flickr.com is a good source for photos. You can show all the Creative Commons photos that are licensed for commercial use. They also offer the Flickr Marketplace showing professional photos that are available to purchase.

List of Free Photo Sites

http://www.wheretofindfreeimages.com/
This page includes many sources of free photos.

RGBStock has some great photos.

http://www.rgbstock.com/
Their licensing is very generous. You may use their images:

2.a In digital format on websites, blogs, multimedia presentations, broadcast film or video and on your cell phone or personal computer as screen background or desktop wallpaper.

2.b In print to decorate your home or your office.

2.c In printed materials such as magazines, newspapers, books, brochures, flyers, text books, wherein the image or images used are for the purpose of illustration and not the primary content for sale or redistribution of the printed materials.

FreeImages.com

http://www.freeimages.com/
This site offers both free images and premium images for sale.

iStockPhoto.com

http://www.istockphoto.com/
This is the standard site for commercial stock photos. Originally started in Calgary, Canada by two young men, they sold the company to Getty images. Most small images suitable for the web run around $40. You can get a 10 image, 1-month subscription for $40.

Read the licensing carefully. They have strict limitations on how an image can be used.

They have recently partnered with http://leanin.org/about/ including photographs of women changing how women are portrayed.

Very high quality photography.

Peg Legg and Sal A. Mander

Many of them are very inappropriate for a lab situation, but I was able to cull about 25 very safe ones from the list.

Often you may find the need to populate a course with sample users so your students can log onto a course and experiment around.

Having sample users is also a great solution for demo courses when you want to allow students to experience hands-on a specific technique.

I discovered a fun list of names at http://www.ethanwiner.com/funnames.html. Many of them are very inappropriate for a lab situation, but I was able to cull about 25 very safe ones from the list.

Here are a few examples: Missy Sippy, Peg Legg, Marshall Law, Mary Christmas, and Sal A. Mander.

Google Website Optimizer

Here is a video showing how Google Website Optimizer allows you to set up “experiments” by comparing two or more versions of a web page to see which one is most effective. This is a free service.

I’m reading an interesting (and very useful) book, Trust Agents by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith. The book shows how to use the Web to build influence, improve reputation, and earn trust and it filled with action items. One of the tidbits I found this morning is Google Website Optimizer.

 

Google Website Optimizer allows you to set up "experiments" by comparing two or more versions of a web page to see which one is most effective. This is a free service.

This video gives a great 2 minute overview right up to the last 10 seconds: "My credibility within the organization has risen and people think I know what I’m doing. (laffin)"

This is a great tool for you (and your web developer) to use to increase the effectiveness of your web sites.

Have you used this tool? Add a comment and let me know how you changed your web pages. What were your results?